Amazon Peru

Amazon Peru

Amazon Peru

Nothing says exotic quite like the Amazon. Its rainforests cover the entire highlands of Peru, and only 5% of the country’s population lives here. Brazil is the only other country that has more square footage of the Amazon Rainforest. The dense vegetation keeps development at bay, making it a perfect location for those seeking to experience raw, unadulterated nature. Get your adrenaline pumping as you trek through thick forests to find various tribes untouched by civilization and one of the world’s greatest biological hotspots.

 

Peru’s Amazon jungle gives you the opportunity to experience nature at its most wild. It’s a dense, vibrant-green carpet of plant and animal life, threaded with serpentine water systems. It just might be the most bio-diverse region on earth, from anacondas to jaguars, and caimans to sloths. Take a traditional canoe up a murky river to try to spot the indigenous pink river dolphin. Be immersed in this exotic jungle and get to know some of its native tribes that have called this sweeping tract of land home for centuries. You’re sure to stay entertained in this rich wilderness.

More than half of the country is covered in rainforest, and this Eden-like habitat is shared with Peru’s neighbouring countries Brazil, Ecuador, and Colombia. The southern jungle is closest to the tourist Mecca of Machu Picchu, but its neighbor, Manú Biosphere Reserve and National Park, is a must-see destination. It’s not hard to get saturated in the untamed jungle with the many parks and reserves scattered all around the country. In the north is the waterway trading hub of Iquitos, reachable only by water or airplane.  The country’s fifth-largest city saw a profitable rubber boom in the last century and attracted many European immigrants. Today, it’s the best jumping-off point for jungle expeditions.

The first expedition in 1537 to conquer the Peruvian jungle was pretty much a failure, and the subsequent centuries were largely unsuccessful due to thick vegetation and intricate waterways. It’s only in recent decades that the rainforest is in a vulnerable position: development is slowly but steadily creeping into the rainforest, whether for tourism, extraction, or agriculture. Logging is threatening to permanently take away precious natural resources, and coca cultivation has seen a violent past. Gold mining is also having a damaging effect on this green ecosystem.

Despite this more recent turmoil, indigenous groups have managed to subsist through hunting, fishing, and a growing cultural tourism trend to stay at their traditional villages which puncture the dense canopy. If you’re seeking a deeper connection to nature, learn from these people who have called the jungle their home for centuries and have cultivated an enduring relationship with it.

You can enjoy this vast and rich wilderness from many locations around the country, whether it be a side trip from Machu Picchu or your own week-long trip into Iquitos’ surrounding jungle. Take advantage of these spectacular views and opportunities to get close to Pachamama (Mother Nature). If you’re looking for exotic and untamed, look no further than Peru’s Amazon.